A gang of British car thieves was caught using a device disguised as a Nintendo Game Boy console to hack security.

This device looked like any other Nintendo Game Boy console but cost about $27,000. This is because the device would let the car thieves start the car engine after bypassing the security with ease, letting them drive off with a stolen vehicle almost effortlessly.

Thieves Used a Supposed Toy to Hack Car Security

According to BBC News Dylan Armer, Christopher Bowes, and Thomas Poulson were stealing cars around their neighborhood. They stole five Mitsubishi Outlanders by using the Game Boy-looking gadget to hack car security systems. They were arrested while trying to steal their 5th Mitsubishi Outlander from a driveway in Scholes.

The car thieves were jailed at Leeds Crown Court after pleading guilty to the crime.

When the police officer stopped the men from stealing the car, he found the Game Boy knock-off device in a secret compartment of their car. They also found a video where Paulson explained how quickly and easily their new gadget lets them steal cars. The police officer said that the video was accompanied by a commentary in mocking tones.

These devices turned out to be auto keys sold by a Bulgarian tech firm SOS Auto Keys. These devices can record data from cars and use it to disguise themselves as an authorized remote to control its entry and ignition. These devices are marketed as the “most advanced locksmith tool”.

The video below shows how it works: